MPs encourage everyday usage of the Mother Tongues

Parliamentarians yesterday called on the Ghanaian populace to eschew every desire to force Ghanaian children to speak only one Ghanaian language and encourage children to speak their own mother tongue. Collectively, the legislators agree that have one’s child speaking impeccable English and unable to speak any Ghanaian language is not anything to be proud of.

 

This discussion opened when the member of Ketu South Abla Dzifa Gomashie read statement to commemorate the International Mother Tongue Day which fell on 22nd February 2022 to the House.  

Mamaga Abla Dzifa Gomashie, who chairs the Ewe Commission of the Africa Academy of Languages, laments the situation where parents use English to train their children even at home. “to ask a child just basic questions in his/her mother tongue with the child not being able to answer. Mr. Speaker, should we watch as a generation of Ghanaians lose not just their identity but also their culture, traditional values, and collective memory?” She asks.

 

Dr. Augustine Tawiah, MP for Bia West, observed that it is unfortunate that colonialism has altered our cultures  and as a people we have ourselves added to our woes by despising what is truly ours. He suggested a continuous research to ensure that our mother tongue is key for us to reduce the gap between what is indigenous to the Ghanian and what is foreign and being incorporated. “We don’t want to incorporate everything wholesale. Our language should accommodate other nuances from other cultures but how do we do this in such a way that we can incorporate them even in our educational system.”

 

MP for Sawla Tuna Kalba Andrew Dari Chiwitey charged members and all Ghanaians, especially people from his constituency, to speak their local languages with their children at home. “It has become a form of pride for some people to think that once I speak English to my child that tells the class I belong to. Mr. Speaker it is completely wrong.  It is time for us to start educating our families. It is time for us to start letting out people know that where we come from, that is where we come from. We didn’t  choose… and so wherever you find yourself let your identity be know.” he appealed to the house.

 

Kwadaso MP Kingsley Nyarko’s believes in using the local language as tool to facilitate easy learning in schools but expressed concerns about the quality, frequency and intensity of the language usage.

 

Many other members including Samuel Okudzeto of South Tongu, Nelson Dafeamekpor of South Dayi, Moses Anim of Trobu, Kofi Adam of Buem, among others hold the belief that knowing one’s native language well, is a foundation to learn other languages and appreciate what is being taught in school and so agree that the Ghanaian languages must be taught in the basic schools. However, in the spirit of oneness they said that our diversity is our strength in unity.

 

Language is a very important tool for sustainable development. It ensures cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue, strengthens cooperation and achieves quality education for all. Mamaga who herself speaks many Ghanaian languages urged her colleagues and stakeholders “to develop a clear and effective school policy to enhance the understanding of children in our schools”.

 

Mother Language Day, highlights multilingualism to ensure inclusiveness in development agendas in accordance with SDG 4.6, which seeks to ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, achieve literacy and numeracy.”

 

This years’ celebration was themed “Using technology for multilingual learning: Challenges and opportunities”.

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GHC 23.00

This book vividly narrates the experience of a hunter and perils he went through during some of his hunting expeditions. It further recounts the hunter’s encounter with Small Pox in human form and how the hunter changed into a tortoise and went to the kingdom of animals

 


GHC 12.00
This is a reading book (1) for beginners.

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Adzowo, Alobalowo kple Gliwo is a compilation of Ewe riddles, proverbs, idioms and their meanings as well as some Ewe folktales.

 

 

GHC12.00
This is a reading book (2) for beginners.

GHC12.00

This is a reading book (2) for beginners.

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This is a reading book (3) for beginners.

 

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The story ‘AGBE NYE NUSI NEWOE’ is about a wedded couple. They had two children, a boy and a girl. The woman divorced the man and married another man. The children were cared for by their father alone. They grew to become important people while their mother grew wretched. 

GHC35.00

Your life begins the moment you are born into this world until the day you die. Nobody’s life journey is the same as another person. We all have different paths. Some live briefly while others live long. Some have a life full of happiness, peace of mind and success. Others live a life full of thorns such as pain, suffering, poverty, sadness, bitterness and so on. However, the journey acknowledge the creator who has the whole world in his hand. Read Agbezuge ƒe ŋutinya and pick up some serious lessons for your own life.

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This is about five gentlemen seeking the hand of a beautiful young maiden in marriage. Her father, a very wealthy man in order to ensure the best man wins the this race, gives these men a task to perform. This test is to find out which of the suitors are after his wealth and to prove who truly loves his only daughter.

GHC25.00

Poverty, it is often said, reduces one’s standing in society. This is the theme of the story in this book which vividly narrates how people in a certain village accorded not even the least respect to a couple because they were poor. Nevertheless they worked hard to support their only son, Semanu through school. After school, the boy had a job with a very meagre salary. Through hard work, however, he managed to get to the very top post in his employment. Get a copy and find out how Semanu’s life transformed his parents lives. 

 

GHC12.00

This booklet is a compilation of some short folkloric stories. It makes a good read for family times.

 

GHC12.00

This booklet is a compilation of some short folkloric stories. It makes a good read for family times.

 

Ewe language study book. Very good for BECE and WASSCE candidates.

GHC24.00

An anthology of very inspiring Ewe poems

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This book contains an alphabetic list of 1256 Ewe idioms and aphorisms with their meanings also given in Ewe. The book is designed purposely for those who want to dive into Ewe classics and for students preparing for examinations requiring an advanced knowledge of Ewe.

GHC30.00

Ewenkowo means Ewe names. The book is a compilation of Ewe names, collected from different parts of Ewe land. The names are divided into thirteen groups. Each chapter treats a particular group of names, giving account on the origin and meaning of the group and provides many examples of names in the group as well.

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The book ‘Ewo moya na fiaga agokoli’ is a drama about the migration of the ancestors of the Ewes from Notsie in the Republic of Togo. The decision to move out of Notsie was necesitated by the excessive wickedness displayed against them by Fiaga Agokoli. 

GHC18.00

A collection of play and action songs suitable for use by school children and the general public.

It is hoped that, this book will be useful to teachers and students in training colleges.

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Commentary on the book ‘Henorwo fe gbe’. 

GHC22.00

This book talks about a man, his wife and children. The man Kuwonu and his wife Agbesinyale were staunch Christians who taught their children live godly lives.

The story teaches us how the children of Kuwonu lived and behaved towards one another and also teaches us what is worth fighting for in life. 

GHC25.00

Hlɔ̃biabia (vengeance) is a story of a boy who suffered a great deal of injustice in the hands of many people including his own teacher and close friends. Torments he suffered made him vow to repay mankind in the way he managed to go overseas where he obtained many degrees. Later, however, when he returned home he rendered good service to people and in addition confessed every wrong he had done and pleaded with the bench for a fitting punishment as an atonement for his sins.

 

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Ku ɖi ƒo na wo is the story of a prince whose parents wanted him to marry a girl he did not love. The prince, instead found, a beautiful maidservant whom he wanted to marry. But he did not make his wishes known to his father as they cut across this, certain incidents sent the fiancée away from home. The prince set out to search for her. On their way back home the girl died. The prince also breathed his las at the outskirt of their town.

 

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This is a collection of some Ewe proverbs

GHC35.00

Ku le xɔme: A novel which vividly describes the fortitude, patience and firmness of detective Agbeko who successfully works on two murder cases and brings the culprits to book.

 

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A collection of some Ewe riddles

GHC20.00

Mia Denyigba (our Homeland) describes in general the size and physical features of the strip of territory known as Eweland. This stretches along the Gulf of Guinea mainly from the eastern bank of River Volta in Ghana to the eastern boundary of Dahomey. It discusses also some customs and occupations of the people.

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This play is about the difficulties of two lovers eager to get married. Dadzi, the principal character, is a young man just back home from Britain with a university degree. He has a lucrative job and is well placed in society. He falls in love with Esinam, the well-bred daughter of a devout but stiff minister of religion. Will the preacher agree to this union? get a copy now.

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Mina miyi wonudrofe (Let us visit the court) is a crime fiction. It describes and gives some practical demonstrations of the trial of criminals by our law courts. The book is not only interesting but also very exciting indeed

GHC32.00

This is  novel talks about how important family is. In the face of civilization, many do not want to cling to family so much  but it is not that easy because the role of  family still remains very critical in everyone’s life; in joyous or sorrowful times.

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This story is about the foolish and arrogant life style of a very pretty young lady. She wasted her own life by reckless lifestyle. Her kind abound in Ghana and the world today. It is my wish that readers of this book, both old and young shall learn from this story and live their lives with wisdom.

GHC26.00

This drama chronicles the series of bad luck that befell Mr. Dzakle until his death.

He lost his wife to death, bushfire consumed his cocoa farm, he sustained severe injury in his waist in an accident so could not go back to farming. 

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Togbui Kpeglo II (Chief Kpeglo II) is a play. it narrates how impudent Togbui Kpeglo was and how unwisely he administered the affairs of his State – the Kokroko State. What did us subject do about him? What became of Chief Kpeglo II? find out. 

GHC12.00

Deviwo miva mife!

GHC 3

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B.E.C.E past questions

 

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GHC45.00

Collection of interesting folk tales for basic schools

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Collection of interesting folk tales for basic schools

GHC50.00

Collection of interesting folk tales for basic schools

English-Ewe picture book with audio for beginners

 

GCH 12.00

Contact NLC for your favorite Ewe Literature books

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AMEYIBORVINYENYE

AMEYIBƆVI NYƆNU WƆNUTEƑEWO LE ƑE 2021 OLYMPICS LÃMESĒFEFE HOƲIƲLI ME.
WOƉU XEXEA ME DZI!
Fianu viwò nyɔnuviwo tso Afrika nyɔnu kalẽtɔ siwo dzata ƒe dzi le dɔme na eye naneke menye mɔxenu na wo le woƒe ʋiʋli vevie me hena nu si wodi be yewoanye la o.
Gblɔna wò ŋutsuviwo be, susu ɖaɖɛ si ɖe abla la le tagbɔ na Afrika nyɔnuviwo eye ŋusē le wo si woɖua akplamatsedoname ɖe sia ɖe dzi kalẽtɔe.
Toe na viwòwo bena ne susu la do ŋusẽ dzì la, naneke meli si womate ŋu awɔ o. Ne woxɔe se la ade wo dzi blibo.
Míena mɔ yevudziɖulawo trɔ míaƒe ŋutinya, ku ɖe ame si míenye ŋu la ta tu. Na mía ŋutɔwo míagblɔ míaƒe ŋutinya!

Eŋlɔla (written by): Abla Dzifa Gomashie

Egɔmeɖela (translated by): Nutifafa Feyi

AMEYIBƆVI NYƆNU WƆNUTEƑEWO
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